Tuesday, July 6, 2010

Top 10 Twitter Tutorials on YouTube

This is a re-post from Pam Dyer’s blog, Pamorama. The Seattle-based marketing professional is @Pam Dyer on Twitter, and she created an excellent compilation of Twitter how-to videos.  Her Twitter is an informative stream of news on how brands are using social media. She’s worth a follow for sure. Here is Pam’s post:

We all know that YouTube is a treasure trove of entertainment, with endless hours of Justin Bieber crooning to tweens and cats playing the piano. But it’s also a terrific resource for learning — there are helpful how-tos about a wide range of topics that do a great job of breaking down complex subjects into visuals that are easy to understand. Users have posted thousands of tutorials ranging from animal care to everyone’s favorite microblogging tool, Twitter.

Whether you want to get your mom started on Twitter or want the scoop on some of Twitter’s best desktop apps and how to use Twitter for brand building, these YouTube videos will keep you entertained while educating you about various aspects of the Twitterverse. 

Twitter in Plain English

This quick, no-nonsense introduction is a great starting point.

Getting Started With Twitter

A simple step by step tutorial on how to create your Twitter account, add friends, and get started tweeting.

Twitter Lists in a Nutshell

A quick looks at the “Lists" feature and how to use it to your advantage.

Twitter Tools Exposed and Explained

An introduction to the top Twitter tools and how to use them in conjunction with each other to get the most out of Twitter for personal or business use.

How to Create an Attractive Twitter Profile

How to  make your Twitter profile page highly attractive and gain more followers.


Finding Followers

This easy Twitter tutorial explains several ways to find people to follow on Twitter.

How to Tweet From Any Cell Phone

This video shows you how to update Twitter from your cell phone using text messaging. This method doesn’t require any additional apps and works on any phone, but standard text messaging rates apply.

How to Use Twitter for Business

Have you signed up for Twitter but found yourself at a loss about what to do with it? This video series will help jumpstart your efforts.

Twitter and Brand Building

How to use Twitter effectively for building customer relationships and brand reputation.

5 Business Benefits of Twitter Even if Your Customers Aren’t Using It Yet

How to get value out of the platform before your customers even join.

 

Wednesday, June 16, 2010

Chris Brogan’s 50 Power Twitter Tips

This article is written by Chris Brogan, or @ChrisBrogan, the President of New Marketing Labs. It is entirely reprinted from ChrisBrogan.com.  We embedded links to his tips to help you find more resources on oneforty. Be sure to check out our Toolkit to see what apps can help make Chris’ tips work for you. Thanks again, Chris!

50 POWER TWITTER TIPS

50 power twitter tipsA while back, I wrote 50 Ideas on Using Twitter for Business. It still gets plenty of attention, as it’s listed as an official resource on the Twitter business resources page (thanks, @ed!). But you know, I can’t leave well enough alone, so here I am with another 50 Power Twitter Tips. Feel free to repost all or any of this, but if you do, please give credit to this link.

I broke them down into five categories: intent, technical, business, integrated usage, and off-twitter. Some could probably fit in more than one category, such as it were.

Here they are, sponsored by the Thesis WordPress theme (affiliate link):

50 Power Twitter Tips

Intent (Human Artist)

  1. Don’t read EVERY tweet. It’s perfectly okay. You have permission.
  2. Follow anyone who follows you (and unfollow spammers/jerks).
  3. Promote other people 12x to every 1 self-promotional tweet.
  4. Build lists to watch people who matter to you more closely.
  5. Retweet the good stuff from others. Sharing is caring.
  6. A lot of @replies shows a lot of humanity/engagement.
  7. Robot tweets are less sexy than human tweets.
  8. Promote the new/less followed more than the “names.”
  9. Set an egg timer. Twitter is addictive.
  10. Everyone does it their own way. You’re doing it wrong, too- to someone.

Thesis Theme for WordPress

Technical

  1. A non-standard background and face avatar means we believe you may be human.
  2. Leave 20 characters or more space in each tweet to improve retweeting.
  3. Use Seesmic or Tweetdeck or Hootsuite so you can see more.
  4. Linking one update to several communities is technically possible. It’s just not respectful of each community’s uniqueness.
  5. Tools like http://bit.ly let you see stats. Use them.
  6. Make hashtags small and simple. We need room to tweet.
  7. If software allows you to “post updates to Twitter” as well as to the app, don’t do that. We rarely want to see them.
  8. If you develop software that pushes updates to Twitter, be VERY explicit how that works.
  9. Every time you use OAUTH to give apps permission to use your account, you open a potential security hole. Check your permissions monthly.
  10. The best mobile app is the one that you feel comfortable using. We don’t know better.

Business

  1. Spamming us repeatedly is okay. We just unfollow you.
  2. Spend more time in search than in chatting us up about your stuff.
  3. Finding people who need what you’re selling trumps advertising to us.
  4. Retweeting someone’s nice words about you is lame and doesn’t buy you more attention. Let it stand.
  5. If your link is an affiliate link or a client, say so (in parentheses).
  6. Your customers might not be on Twitter. Use rapleaf to find them.
  7. Invite your customers to Twitter, then make it worth it for them.
  8. Use Twitter as a personalized communication tool, not another blast.
  9. Having different accounts for everything seems like the right move, until you realize it’s hard to grow multiple followings.
  10. Just make money and then the boss won’t ask about ROI any more.

Integrated Usage

  1. Twitter makes every event better. Post the hashtag everywhere. Make every speaker sign/label/name include a Twitter ID.
  2. Apps like TweetChat.com make following event chats really easy. Put in a hashtag and go.
  3. Tweeting the content of events is nice, but so is occasionally making a real live connection with the speaker.
  4. It’s okay to tweet your blog posts, but try asking a question that leads readers into the post.
  5. Can you invite Twitter followers to your other social platforms, like LinkedIn or Facebook? Sure you can.
  6. I’m not into mixing my location apps with my tweets, but if you do, do it FROM the location app into Twitter, not the other way around.
  7. Getting others to tweet your posts or news or registrations is useful, but sometimes comes off as a barrage or spam. Be prepared for that perception.
  8. Tweets that point us to photos and/or video and/or music, etc, are always a great way to enhance the experience.
  9. Please remove Twitter from LinkedIn. Use the #in tag instead and be selective.
  10. Spammy or no, events that tweet their attendance registration seem to drive attendance.

Off-Twitter

  1. Are your tweets really what you want to show in your sidebar? Doesn’t that direct peopleaway from your site?
  2. Think of Twitter as a guidance system to what you think is interesting. A lot of that is likely off-Twitter.
  3. Apps like VisibleTweets.com are neat, but can be very distracting at events.
  4. If you use tweets on a screen at an event, be warned if you moderate. Angry crowds can happen.
  5. Don’t forget to invite people from off-Twitter to follow you on Twitter. Include your actual Twitter ID (I see lots of “follow me on Twitter” with no details).
  6. Asking questions on Twitter makes for very interesting commentary and opinions for blog posts.
  7. Tweetups are awesome, especially if you make them about more than just drinking and saying hi. (Though, hey, drinks can be nice.)
  8. Outside of the Twitter app, keep “Tw” names to a minimum. We’re not your “tweeps.”
  9. If your only marketing efforts are on Twitter, start building an email marketing list. Never put your eggs in one basket.
  10. Start thinking in 120 characters (remember? save 20). Every bit of this advice is tweetable.

Your mileage may vary. Some of these might be really helpful and others might not be that useful at all, given your own situations. In fact, feel free to make your own version, add and subtract at will, and comment on where you disagree or agree. It’s all up for discussion. Besides, you’re doing it wrong.